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What are the references in the Podcast intro?

The Bitcoin Cash Podcast intro is a brief chronology/summary of the history of Bitcoin - drawing on a couple of the most famous events and comments in the Bitcoin (Cash) timeline.

The song is D1$L0YAL, by The Bitcoin Cash Podcast!

  • Jamie Dimon (2015): Jamie Dimon is the CEO of JP Morgan bank, and since the very early days of cryptocurrency has been like the "final boss" of bank opposition, slander and denial. Needless to say, his frantic bleating has been totally ineffective at stopping the movement, which has marched on through more than a decade of his complaining that it won't take over.
  • Bitcoin Whitepaper (2008): The original design document for Bitcoin, which explained the concept and spawned the entire cryptocurrency movement. It is only a brief 9 pages (including pictures, references and a lot of whitespace). Although some sections are a little technical, the general premise described in the Abstract and Introduction can be understood by anyone. Read it here.
  • Bitcoin Pizza (2010): The first purchase of anything for Bitcoin was made on the Bitcointalk forum by a user named laszlo. He paid 10 000 Bitcoins for his 2 pizzas, which in retrospect have become the most expensive pizzas in history. Of course, the only reason Bitcoin gained any value at all was this initial demonstration of paying in cryptocurrency, so he rightly has no regrets on this account. This momentous event is commemerated every year on "Bitcoin Pizza day". Read more here.
  • Silk Road (2011): The Silk Road was an anonymous online dark marketplace for buying and selling goods (frequently: drugs) using Bitcoin. This expanded the concept of Bitcoin commerce to demonstrate the ability to have an entire economy built around cryptocurrency. The site was shut down in 2013 by the FBI, and its pioneering founder Ross Ulbricht placed in prison, but was soon replaced by both legal and illegal Bitcoin e-commerce imitators.
  • Honey badger (2013): The early Bitcoin community would say "Bitcoin is the honey badger of money", to describe its relentless and uncaring persistence through any amount of chaos. This early billboard was a classic example. Note the strange Bitcoin sign with a slash through the lower half, which was one proposed early currency symbol that never caught on.
  • Dorian Nakamoto (2014): The identity of Bitcoin's anonymous creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, has always been a hotly discussed topic. In one of the most famous incidents over this mystery, a journalist called Leah Goodman misidentified an elderly Japanese-American man as Satoshi, based primarily on the coincidence of his name being "Dorian Nakamoto". Flabbergasted at the sudden surge of unwanted media attention he immediately received over a technology he knew nothing about, Dorian became an ironic cult celebrity in the Bitcoin community.
  • Punk rock (2015): Between about 2013 and 2017, Andreas Antonopolous was the most sought after and respected public proponent for Bitcoin. He tried a variety of ways to explain Bitcoin to confused audiences, and one of his most poignant was the description of Bitcoin not as the refined "smooth jazz", but as the unruly and uncompromising "punk rock". His inclusion here is a nod to his early contributions, but also a sarcastic poke at his later support of Bitcoin BTC - taken over and neutered by the banks - selling out the anarchic ideals of Bitcoin that he so fervently and accurately described for Bitcoin. It also partly inspired the song used in the clip, the Bitcoin rock song D1$L0YAL.
  • Bankruptcy (2018): After the 2017 split away from Bitcoin BTC, the Bitcoin Cash community had to reorganise itself. Internal tensions came to a head at the Miners conference in Bangkok, where Craig Wright - a man claiming without proof to be Satoshi Nakamoto - announced in an interview with Hayden Otto that if the network split he would bankrupt those not on his side of the split. Just as with his other claims, his mouth was writing cheques that he couldn't cash. Craig and his followers did split the network to form Bitcoin SV, but failed entirely to bankrupt the BCH community as promised. Bitcoin once more proved itself as the punk-rock, honey badger of money that suffers threats from no one and Craig again cemented his reputation as an ineffective liar.
  • Debate (2019): An all time classic of Bitcoin history, where "big blocker" and BCH supporter Roger Ver debates "small blocker" and BTC supporter Tone Vays in Malta over the truth of Bitcoin. Part of the debate focussed on the inability of BTC to serve as a payments mechanism without the much promised "Lightning Network" - which Tone admits to not even using himself despite his hypocritically adamant position that it would be a panacea for returning BTC to operation as a payments system.
  • Censored Debate (2021): This theme of BTC and BCH debate re-occured two years later, with a group of BTC "maximalists" debating internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom. A generally poor showing by the BTC side included a total "own goal" where they admitted that Bitcoin BTC was no longer a threat to the US Dollar - the founding mission of Bitcoin which the Bitcoin Cash community had retained. Ashamed by their own weak arguments and childish behaviour, the hosts deleted the debate audio, but it was preserved by the BCH community. A complete review with commentary was also conducted on The Bitcoin Cash Podcast itself.
  • Next generation (2021): In the 2021 year end review, an unscheduled appearance by BCH content creator Ryan Giffin's son Miles provided the perfect moment illustrating the change in generations that makes cryptocurrency adoption inevitable.